who vs whom -Easy Ways to Remember

who vs. whom

who vs whom

Who vs. Whom: It's one of the trickiest grammar questions around and can sometimes seem confusing. But don't worry, we're here to help. This article will explain the difference between who and whom and when to use each one.

Who is the subject of a sentence, and who is the object? Simple as that. Let's take a look at some examples:

  • "Who is the best basketball player in the world?"
  • "You are the best basketball player in the world."

In both of these sentences, "who" is the subject. It's doing the action (being the best basketball player in the world).

"Whom should I vote for?"

"You should vote for me."

In this sentence, "whom" is the object. It's receiving the action (voting).

Law: Who acts as an object, who acts as an object.

Use who when using verbs. Use who when obtaining an action.

Kim is an athlete who enjoys running long distances. An usher wrote a letter to a friend he had never seen.

This rule can be confusing in two ways: starting a question and introducing bias.

A sentence Start a question:

If the question can be answered with a subject pronoun (he, she, it or they), use who or whoever.

If you can answer with an object pronoun (he, she or they), use who or whoever. to

Example:

  • Q: Who is at the door?
  • A: They are. [This sentence can only be answered with a subject pronoun, such as "they"]
  • Q: Who did he say?
  • A: He told him. [The answer is in the objective state: "he" is the subject of the verb "said."]

Introduction of the dependent clause:&

If it is a subject pronoun in a sentence only (not the whole sentence), which is correct? if

It's an object pronoun, so who's right? Example:

Many people do not like the new leader we have elected. [In the "what we chose" part, the object pronoun is a plural verb

Chosen, someone says: "We chose him."

An older woman who lives on central street is afraid. [In the Main Street Life category, the subject is a pronoun. Someone said: "He

He lives on the main street.

To learn how to use who as a relative pronoun, visit: www.khanacademy.org/

Humanities / Grammar / Speech - Parts of nature / Ethnicities

To find out who turns sweatpants into pants, visit: theoatmeal.com/comics/who_vs_whom

"Whom should I vote for?"

"You should vote for me."

In this sentence, "whom" is the object. It's receiving the action (voting).

Learn more about "Who" and "Who."

To understand the difference between "who" and "which," you need to know the difference between the subject of a verb and the object of a verb. If you're new to grammar and don't know what these terms mean, don't worry. They're more straightforward than they look, and you're already effectively dealing with topics and objects (even if you don't know them).

"Who" is the subject of a verb.

The word "which" can only be used when it is the subject of a verb. It just means it's like the words "I," "he," "she," "we," and "they." Just like "who," these words are used as subjects. Confusing "who / who" is no different from confusing combinations like "me / me" or "he / he". Here they are all in one table:

A simple trick to find "who".

Suppose that part of the sentence makes more sense with "he" instead of "who"; then "who" is definitely correct. Example:

  • Who paid for the food? He paid for the food.
  • (Since "he" is correct, "who" must be correct.)
  • I have never met a person who lives in a cabin. ("He lives in a little house" is fine, "who" should be correct.)
  • I wonder who is responsible.
  • ("He is responsible" sounds right, so "who" must be correct.)
  • Who did Sara give the ticket to? ("gave him the ticket" sounds wrong, "who" should be wrong. It should be "who gave the ticket?".)

This trick works because "who" and "he" are the verbs' subjects. They say they are about mental.

"Who" = "They"

To do this plural trick, replace the word "who" with the word "they."

I met people on the plane.

("They were on the plane" doesn't matter, "which" should be correct.)

"A simple trick to find out who is 11 years old

Replace "who" with "he" (or plural "they"). "Which" is certainly true if that sentence still makes sense.

Who did Sarah give the ticket to? ("Sarah gave him the ticket" is fine, "which" should be correct.)

The witness saw four boys, one of whom was limping.

(Since "one of them" is correct, "which" should be correct.)

Inaccessible? Use "Who" 

If you're still not sure which one to use, use "which". First, it is much more common than "who." Second, the use of "whom" is considered by many to be the last step in the English language, and some sources already describe "whom" as obsolete.

You may have noticed that the pronouns "you" and "it" does not distinguish between subject and object, and "who" also seems to be necessary. Check out this example:

Which do you believe, me or your eyes? (comedian Groucho Marx)

(This Groucho Marx quote is incorrect. It is necessary to start with "whom to believe." (However, "who" sounds a bit far-fetched, don't you think?)

Examples of "who" and "which" in a sentence

Here are more examples of "which" and "which" in sentences. Note that "who" always does the verb's action (in bold). Remember, "who" never does.

Who paid for the food? ("Who" is the meaning of the verb "Pay.")

I've never seen a man living in a cabin on the beach for a week.

("Who" is the meaning of the verb "live".)

I wonder who responds. ("Which" means "to be," i.e., "that" is the object of the verb.)

Do you know the boy who called?

(Yar means wrong)

Who did Sarah give the ticket to? ("Sara" means "given." "Ki" means nothing. "Ki" is correct.)

Let's look at the incorrect version of the last example:

Who did Sara give the ticket to? (Here's how to say, "Sarah gave her a ticket.")

Examples of the real life of people who "abuse."

Often it would help if you looked at your phrase to see "which" means a verb. Here are two examples of real-life failed people:

If you notice the wrong equipment or risks, tell them to your supervisor. (This is incorrect. It should be "who informs management.")

Here is a slightly more complicated example from a television magazine. "Which" is incorrect because it means "was."

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